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dc.contributor.authorKatz, Timor  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorYahel, Gitai  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorReidenbach, Matthew A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTunnicliffe, Verena  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHerut, Barak  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCrusius, John  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWhitney, Frank  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSnelgrove, Paul V. R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLazar, Boaz  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-17T17:43:54Z
dc.date.available2014-04-17T17:43:54Z
dc.date.issued2012-07
dc.identifier.citationLimnology and Oceanography 57 (2012): 945-958en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6564
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, 2012. This article is posted here by permission of Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Limnology and Oceanography 57 (2012): 945-958, doi:10.4319/lo.2012.57.4.0945.en_US
dc.description.abstractOxygen availability restricts groundfish to the oxygenated, shallow margins of Saanich Inlet, an intermittently anoxic fjord in British Columbia, Canada. New and previously reported 210Pb measurements in sediment cores compared with flux data from sediment traps indicate major focusing of sediments from the oxygenated margins to the anoxic basin seafloor. We present environmental and experimental evidence that groundfish activity in the margins is the major contributor to this focusing. Fine particles resuspended by groundfish are advected offshore by weak bottom currents, eventually settling in the anoxic basin. Transmittance and sediment trap data from the water column show that this transport process maintains an intermediate nepheloid layer (INL) in the center of the Inlet. This INL is located above the redox interface and is unrelated to water density shifts in the water column. We propose that this INL is shaped by the distribution of groundfish (as resuspension sources) along the slope and hence by oxygen availability to these fish. We support this conclusion with a conceptual model of the resuspension and offshore transport of sediment. This fish-induced transport mechanism for sediments is likely to enhance organic matter decomposition in oxygenated sediments and its sequestration in anoxic seafloors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe VENUS Project and University of Victoria supported the ship and submersible time for field experiments, and the U.S. Geological Survey and Coastal and Marine Geological Program generously supported J.C. The project was supported by Discovery Grants from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada to V.T. and P.S. and a Yohay Ben-Nun fellowship and Moshe Shilo Center for Marine Biogeochemistry Fund award to T.K.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanographyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.4319/lo.2012.57.4.0945
dc.titleResuspension by fish facilitates the transport and redistribution of coastal sedimentsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4319/lo.2012.57.4.0945


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