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dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Laura T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTank, Jennifer L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHall, Robert O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMulholland, Patrick J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, Stephen K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorValett, H. Maurice  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWebster, Jackson R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBernot, Melody J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcDowell, William H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Bruce J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorThomas, Suzanne M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-14T15:32:42Z
dc.date.available2014-04-14T15:32:42Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.citationLimnology and Oceanography 58 (2013): 1271-1285en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6552
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Limnology and Oceanography 58 (2013): 1271-1285, doi:10.4319/lo.2013.58.4.1271.en_US
dc.description.abstractMost nitrogen (N) assimilation in lake and marine ecosystems is often subsequently released via autochthonous dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) production, but autochthonous DON production has yet to be quantified in flowing waters. We measured in-stream DON production following 24 h 15N-nitrate () tracer additions in 36 headwater streams, a subset of sites from the second Lotic Intersite Nitrogen eXperiment. Streams were located in five North American ecoregions and drained basins dominated by native vegetation, agriculture, or urban land use. Using a two-compartment model, we could quantify DON production in 15 streams as a function of DO15N derived from 15N tracer in biomass compartments. The streams with detectable DON production had higher % modified land use (agriculture + urban) in their basins than did streams with undetectable DON production. Median DON production represented 8% of total uptake when we used N biomass estimates based on N assimilated over 1 d (measured directly from the 15N additions). Median DON production was 17% of total uptake when we used N assimilated over 42 d (extrapolated from previous 15N tracer studies). Variation in DON production was positively correlated with ecosystem respiration, indicating that stream heterotrophy may influence DON production. In-stream DON production was similar in magnitude to stream denitrification and nitrification, indicating that the production of autochthonous DON can represent a substantial transformation of stream N. Our results confirm that headwater streams can quickly convert inorganic N into organic forms, although the ultimate fate of DON remains unclear.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation Division of Environmental Biology (NSF DEB-0111410), and L. Johnson was partially supported by fellowships from the Center for Aquatic Conservation at the University of Notre Dame and the Bayer Corporation while preparing this manuscript.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAssociation for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanographyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.4319/lo.2013.58.4.1271
dc.titleQuantifying the production of dissolved organic nitrogen in headwater streams using 15N tracer additionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.4319/lo.2013.58.4.1271


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