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dc.contributor.authorSchmitz, Oswald J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRaymond, Peter A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorEstes, James A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKurz, Werner A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHoltgrieve, Gordon W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRitchie, Mark E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSchindler, Daniel E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSpivak, Amanda C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilson, Rod W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBradford, Mark A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChristensen, Villy  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDeegan, Linda A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSmetacek, Victor  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorVanni, Michael J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilmers, Christopher C.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-03T19:54:26Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:26Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6537
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2013. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Springer for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Ecosystems 17 (2014): 344-359, doi:10.1007/s10021-013-9715-7.en_US
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the biogeochemical processes regulating carbon cycling is central to mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions. The role of living organisms has been accounted for, but the focus has traditionally been on contributions of plants and microbes. We develop the case that fully “animating” the carbon cycle requires broader consideration of the functional role of animals in mediating biogeochemical processes and quantification of their effects on carbon storage and exchange among terrestrial and aquatic reservoirs and the atmosphere. To encourage more hypothesis-driven experimental research that quantifies animal effects we discuss the mechanisms by which animals may affect carbon exchanges and storage within and among ecosystems and the atmosphere. We illustrate how those mechanisms lead to multiplier effects whose magnitudes may rival those of more traditional carbon storage and exchange rate estimates currently used in the carbon budget. Many animal species are already directly managed. Thus improved quantitative understanding of their influence on carbon budgets may create opportunity for management and policy to identify and implement new options for mitigating CO2 release at regional scales.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank YCEI for its sponsorship and funding. Regular and OPUS grants from US National Science Foundation, grants from the UK Natural Environmental Research Council and UK Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council, and funding from the Nippon Foundation - UBC Nereus Program, also supported our work.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-013-9715-7
dc.subjectAnimal mediation of carbon cyclingen_US
dc.subjectAnimal multiplier effectsen_US
dc.subjectAnimal management for carbon storageen_US
dc.subjectBiogeochemical cyclingen_US
dc.subjectRegional carbon budgetsen_US
dc.titleAnimating the carbon cycleen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US
dc.description.embargo2014-09-19en_US


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