Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRalston, David K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWarner, John C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGeyer, W. Rockwell  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWall, Gary R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-18T19:51:16Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-18
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Research Letters 40 (2013): 5451–5455en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6501
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Research Letters 40 (2013): 5451–5455, doi:10.1002/2013GL057906.en_US
dc.description.abstractTropical Storms Irene and Lee in 2011 produced intense precipitation and flooding in the U.S. Northeast, including the Hudson River watershed. Sediment input to the Hudson River was approximately 2.7 megaton, about 5 times the long-term annual average. Rather than the common assumption that sediment is predominantly trapped in the estuary, observations and model results indicate that approximately two thirds of the new sediment remained trapped in the tidal freshwater river more than 1 month after the storms and only about one fifth of the new sediment reached the saline estuary. High sediment concentrations were observed in the estuary, but the model results suggest that this was predominantly due to remobilization of bed sediment. Spatially localized deposits of new and remobilized sediment were consistent with longer term depositional records. The results indicate that tidal rivers can intercept (at least temporarily) delivery of terrigenous sediment to the marine environment during major flow events.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by grants from the Hudson Research Foundation (002/07A) and the National Science Foundation (1232928).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/msword
dc.format.mimetypeimage/tiff
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1002/2013GL057906
dc.subjectSediment transporten_US
dc.subjectTidal riveren_US
dc.subjectEstuaryen_US
dc.subjectSediment trappingen_US
dc.titleSediment transport due to extreme events : the Hudson River estuary after tropical storms Irene and Leeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2014-04-18en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/2013GL057906


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record