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dc.contributor.authorBoucher, Jason M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChen, Changsheng  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSun, Yunfang  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBeardsley, Robert C.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T18:52:29Z
dc.date.available2013-10-23T18:52:29Z
dc.date.issued2013-07-30
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series 487 (2013): 201-215en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6274
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Inter-Research, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Inter-Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marine Ecology Progress Series 487 (2013): 201-215, doi:10.3354/meps10462.en_US
dc.description.abstractGeorges Bank is a region of high biological productivity characterized by a well-defined clockwise tidal rectified circulation gyre. Fluctuations in the year-class strength of haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus on Georges Bank have been attributed to mortality during the highly vulnerable larval stages. While predation and starvation greatly impact on survival, advection to unfavorable regions may result in greatly reduced numbers of individuals. For successful self-recruitment to occur, individuals must remain within the shoal region of Georges Bank until settlement. An individual-based model (IBM) was utilized to estimate the retention of haddock eggs and larvae on Georges Bank annually for 1995 through 2009. The IBM was driven by the Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for the Gulf of Maine domain. Biological components of haddock larvae were omitted to restrict analyses to the impact of circulation on passive transport. Inflow over the Scotian Shelf and tidal interaction patterns were identified as the major drivers of variability in interannual transport-retention dynamics. The simulations indicated that retention rates were highest in 2000 and 2003, and lowest in 1997. The above-average retention in 2000 and 2003 with anomalously large recruitment only in 2003 indicates that high retention appears to be necessary but not sufficient to explain large recruitment events of haddock on Georges Bank.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research is supported by the U.S. GLOBEC Northwest Atlantic/Georges Bank Program NSF (OCE-0234545, 0227679, 0606928, 0726851 and 0814505. The GoM3-FVCOM product was built with support from the NOAA NERACOOS and Massachusetts Ocean Partnership (MOP) (renamed SeaPlan in 2012) programs. C.C. was also supported by the Shanghai Ocean University International Cooperation Program (No. A-2302-11-0003), the Program of Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality (No. 09320503700) and the Leading Academic Discipline Project of Shanghai Municipal Education Commission (Project number J50702).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInter-Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/meps10462
dc.subjectLarval retentionen_US
dc.subjectHaddocken_US
dc.subjectModelingen_US
dc.subjectGeorges Banken_US
dc.subjectBio-physical couplingen_US
dc.subjectFish early life history stagesen_US
dc.subjectFish larvaeen_US
dc.titleEffects of interannual environmental variability on the transport-retention dynamics in haddock Melanogrammus aeglefinus larvae on Georges Banken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps10462


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