Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoore, Michael J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorvan der Hoop, Julie  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBarco, Susan G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCostidis, Alexander M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGulland, Frances M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJepson, Paul D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMoore, Kathleen M. T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRaverty, Stephen A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcLellan, William A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-23T18:11:34Z
dc.date.available2013-10-23T18:11:34Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-11
dc.identifier.citationDiseases of Aquatic Organisms 103 (2013): 229-264en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6271
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Inter-Research, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Inter-Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Diseases of Aquatic Organisms 103 (2013): 229-264, doi:10.3354/dao02566.en_US
dc.description.abstractPost-mortem examination of dead and live stranded beach-cast pinnipeds and cetaceans for determination of a cause of death provides valuable information for the management, mitigation and prosecution of unintentional and sometimes malicious human impacts, such as vessel collision, fishing gear entanglement and gunshot. Delayed discovery, inaccessibility, logistics, human safety concerns, and weather make these events challenging. Over the past 3 decades, in response to public concern and federal and state or provincial regulations mandating such investigations to inform mitigation efforts, there has been an increasing effort to objectively and systematically investigate these strandings from a diagnostic and forensic perspective. This Theme Section provides basic investigative methods, and case definitions for each of the more commonly recognized case presentations of human interactions in pinnipeds and cetaceans. Wild animals are often adversely affected by factors such as parasitism, anthropogenic contaminants, biotoxins, subclinical microbial infections and competing habitat uses, such as prey depletion and elevated background and episodic noise. Understanding the potential contribution of these subclinical factors in predisposing or contributing to a particular case of trauma of human origin is hampered, especially where putrefaction is significant and resources as well as expertise are limited. These case criteria descriptions attempt to acknowledge those confounding factors to enable an appreciation of the significance of the observed human-derived trauma in that broader context where possible.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by NOAA Cooperative Agreement NA09OAR4320129.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInter-Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/dao02566
dc.subjectSealen_US
dc.subjectDolphinen_US
dc.subjectWhaleen_US
dc.subjectMarine mammalen_US
dc.subjectEntrapmenten_US
dc.subjectEntanglementen_US
dc.subjectVessel strikeen_US
dc.subjectGunshoten_US
dc.titleCriteria and case definitions for serious injury and death of pinnipeds and cetaceans caused by anthropogenic traumaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/dao02566


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record