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dc.contributor.authorStephen, Ralph A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBolmer, S. Thompson  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorUdovydchenkov, Ilya A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWorcester, Peter F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDzieciuch, Matthew A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAndrew, Rex K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMercer, James A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorColosi, John A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Bruce M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-09T18:46:24Z
dc.date.available2013-10-09T18:46:24Z
dc.date.issued2013-10
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 (2013): 3307-3317en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6251
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Acoustical Society of America, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Acoustical Society of America for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 (2013): 3307-3317, doi:10.1121/1.4818845.en_US
dc.description.abstractOcean bottom seismometer observations at 5000 m depth during the long-range ocean acoustic propagation experiment in the North Pacific in 2004 show robust, coherent, late arrivals that are not readily explained by ocean acoustic propagation models. These “deep seafloor” arrivals are the largest amplitude arrivals on the vertical particle velocity channel for ranges from 500 to 3200 km. The travel times for six (of 16 observed) deep seafloor arrivals correspond to the sea surface reflection of an out-of-plane diffraction from a seamount that protrudes to about 4100 m depth and is about 18 km from the receivers. This out-of-plane bottom-diffracted surface-reflected energy is observed on the deep vertical line array about 35 dB below the peak amplitude arrivals and was previously misinterpreted as in-plane bottom-reflected surface-reflected energy. The structure of these arrivals from 500 to 3200 km range is remarkably robust. The bottom-diffracted surface-reflected mechanism provides a means for acoustic signals and noise from distant sources to appear with significant strength on the deep seafloor.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe OBS/Hs used in the LOAPEX field program were provided by Scripps Institution of Oceanography under the U.S. National Ocean Bottom Seismic Instrumentation Pool (SIO-OBSIP, http:// www.obsip.org). The OBS/H deployments themselves were co-funded through direct funding to SIO-OBSIP by the National Science Foundation and by Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution under a grant from the WHOI Deep Ocean Exploration Institute. The LOAPEX source deployments and the moored DVLA receiver deployments were funded by the Office of Naval Research under Award Nos. N00014-03-1-0181 and N00014-03-1-0182. The data reduction and analysis in this paper were funded by the Office of Naval Research under Award Nos. N00014-06-1-0222 and N00014-10-1-0510. Additional post-cruise analysis support was provided to RAS through the Edward W. and Betty J. Scripps Chair for Excellence in Oceanography.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1121/1.4818845
dc.subjectAcoustic arraysen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic noiseen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic signal processingen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic wave reflectionen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic wave velocityen_US
dc.subjectLong-range orderen_US
dc.subjectOcean wavesen_US
dc.subjectSeafloor phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectSeismometersen_US
dc.subjectSurface acoustic wavesen_US
dc.subjectSurface energyen_US
dc.subjectUnderwater acoustic propagationen_US
dc.titleDeep seafloor arrivals in long range ocean acoustic propagationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/1.4818845


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