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dc.contributor.authorBaumgartner, Mark F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFratantoni, David M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHurst, Thomas P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBrown, Moira W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCole, Timothy V. N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorVan Parijs, Sofie M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Mark P.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-08-28T15:14:58Z
dc.date.available2013-08-28T15:14:58Z
dc.date.issued2013-08
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 (2013): 1814-1823en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6192
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Acoustical Society of America, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Acoustical Society of America for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 134 (2013): 1814-1823, doi:10.1121/1.4816406.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn the past decade, much progress has been made in real-time passive acoustic monitoring of marine mammal occurrence and distribution from autonomous platforms (e.g., gliders, floats, buoys), but current systems focus primarily on a single call type produced by a single species, often from a single location. A hardware and software system was developed to detect, classify, and report 14 call types produced by 4 species of baleen whales in real time from ocean gliders. During a 3-week deployment in the central Gulf of Maine in late November and early December 2012, two gliders reported over 25 000 acoustic detections attributed to fin, humpback, sei, and right whales. The overall false detection rate for individual calls was 14%, and for right, humpback, and fin whales, false predictions of occurrence during 15-min reporting periods were 5% or less. Transmitted pitch tracks—compact representations of sounds—allowed unambiguous identification of both humpback and fin whale song. Of the ten cases when whales were sighted during aerial or shipboard surveys and a glider was within 20 km of the sighting location, nine were accompanied by real-time acoustic detections of the same species by the glider within ±12 h of the sighting time.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Office of Naval Research funded this work, with additional support provided by the NOAA Fisheries Advanced Sampling Technologies Working Group via the Cooperative Institute for the North Atlantic Region.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1121/1.4816406
dc.subjectAcoustic signal detectionen_US
dc.subjectAcoustic transducersen_US
dc.subjectUnderwater sounden_US
dc.titleReal-time reporting of baleen whale passive acoustic detections from ocean glidersen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/1.4816406


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