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dc.contributor.authorMoeller, Holly V.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNeubert, Michael G.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-07-11T18:21:06Z
dc.date.available2013-07-11T18:21:06Z
dc.date.issued2013-07
dc.identifier.citationEcological Applications 23 (2013): 959–971en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/6069
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Ecological Society of America, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of Ecological Society of America for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Ecological Applications 23 (2013): 959–971, doi:10.1890/12-0447.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe biological benefits of marine reserves have garnered favor in the conservation community, but “no-take” reserve implementation is complicated by the economic interests of fishery stakeholders. There are now a number of studies examining the conditions under which marine reserves can provide both economic and ecological benefits. A potentially important reality of fishing that these studies overlook is that fishing can damage the habitat of the target stock. Here, we construct an equilibrium bioeconomic model that incorporates this habitat damage and show that the designation of marine reserves, coupled with the implementation of a tax on fishing effort, becomes both biologically and economically favorable as habitat sensitivity increases. We also study the effects of varied degrees of spatial control on fisheries management. Together, our results provide further evidence for the potential monetary and biological value of spatial management, and the possibility of a mutually beneficial resolution to the fisherman–conservationist marine reserve designation dilemma.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipM. G. Neubert acknowledges the support of the National Science Foundation (DMS-0532378, OCE-1031256) and a Thomas B. Wheeler Award for Ocean Science and Society. H. V. Moeller acknowledges support from a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. This research is based in part on work supported by Award No. USA 00002 made by King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1890/12-0447.1
dc.subjectBioeconomicsen_US
dc.subjectDestructive fishing practicesen_US
dc.subjectFisheriesen_US
dc.subjectHabitat damageen_US
dc.subjectMarine protected areasen_US
dc.subjectMarine reservesen_US
dc.subjectOptimal controlen_US
dc.subjectOptimal harvestingen_US
dc.subjectSpatial managementen_US
dc.titleHabitat damage, marine reserves, and the value of spatial managementen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1890/12-0447.1


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