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dc.contributor.authorWaterman, Stephanie N.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNaveira Garabato, Alberto C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPolzin, Kurt L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-16T18:07:30Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:23Z
dc.date.issued2013-02
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 43 (2013): 259–282en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5852
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 43 (2013): 259–282, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-11-0194.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study reports on observations of turbulent dissipation and internal wave-scale flow properties in a standing meander of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) north of the Kerguelen Plateau. The authors characterize the intensity and spatial distribution of the observed turbulent dissipation and the derived turbulent mixing, and consider underpinning mechanisms in the context of the internal wave field and the processes governing the waves’ generation and evolution. The turbulent dissipation rate and the derived diapycnal diffusivity are highly variable with systematic depth dependence. The dissipation rate is generally enhanced in the upper 1000–1500 m of the water column, and both the dissipation rate and diapycnal diffusivity are enhanced in some places near the seafloor, commonly in regions of rough topography and in the vicinity of strong bottom flows associated with the ACC jets. Turbulent dissipation is high in regions where internal wave energy is high, consistent with the idea that interior dissipation is related to a breaking internal wave field. Elevated turbulence occurs in association with downward-propagating near-inertial waves within 1–2 km of the surface, as well as with upward-propagating, relatively high-frequency waves within 1–2 km of the seafloor. While an interpretation of these near-bottom waves as lee waves generated by ACC jets flowing over small-scale topographic roughness is supported by the qualitative match between the spatial patterns in predicted lee wave radiation and observed near-bottom dissipation, the observed dissipation is found to be only a small percentage of the energy flux predicted by theory. The mismatch suggests an alternative fate to local dissipation for a significant fraction of the radiated energy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSW acknowledges the support of the Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London. ACNG acknowledges the support of a NERC Advanced Research Fellowship (Grant NE/C517633/1). KLP acknowledges support from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution bridge support funds.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-11-0194.1
dc.subjectDiapycnal mixingen_US
dc.subjectInternal wavesen_US
dc.subjectTurbulenceen_US
dc.titleInternal waves and turbulence in the Antarctic Circumpolar Currenten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2013-08-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-11-0194.1


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