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dc.contributor.authorPapadopoulos, Vassilis P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAbualnaja, Yasser  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJosey, Simon A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBower, Amy S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRaitsos, Dionysios E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKontoyiannis, Harilaos  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHoteit, Ibrahim  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-09T16:03:56Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:23Z
dc.date.issued2013-03-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Climate 26 (2013): 1685–1701en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5842
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2013. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Climate 26 (2013): 1685–1701, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00267.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe influence of the atmospheric circulation on the winter air–sea heat fluxes over the northern Red Sea is investigated during the period 1985–2011. The analysis based on daily heat flux values reveals that most of the net surface heat exchange variability depends on the behavior of the turbulent components of the surface flux (the sum of the latent and sensible heat). The large-scale composite sea level pressure (SLP) maps corresponding to turbulent flux minima and maxima show distinct atmospheric circulation patterns associated with each case. In general, extreme heat loss (with turbulent flux lower than −400 W m−2) over the northern Red Sea is observed when anticyclonic conditions prevail over an area extending from the Mediterranean Sea to eastern Asia along with a recession of the equatorial African lows system. Subcenters of high pressure associated with this pattern generate the required steep SLP gradient that enhances the wind magnitude and transfers cold and dry air masses from higher latitudes. Conversely, turbulent flux maxima (heat loss minimization with values from −100 to −50 W m−2) are associated with prevailing low pressures over the eastern Mediterranean and an extended equatorial African low that reaches the southern part of the Red Sea. In this case, a smooth SLP field over the northern Red Sea results in weak winds over the area that in turn reduce the surface heat loss. At the same time, southerlies blowing along the main axis of the Red Sea transfer warm and humid air northward, favoring heat flux maxima.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors acknowledge the Red Sea Research Center (RSRC) at King Abdullah University for Science and Technology (KAUST) for kindly sponsoring this study. Amy Bower was supported by Awards USA 00002, KSA 00011, and KSA 00011/02 made by KAUST to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00267.1
dc.subjectExtreme eventsen_US
dc.subjectAir-sea interactionen_US
dc.subjectForcingen_US
dc.subjectSurface fluxesen_US
dc.subjectTrendsen_US
dc.titleAtmospheric forcing of the winter air–sea heat fluxes over the northern Red Seaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2013-09-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-12-00267.1


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