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dc.contributor.authorGyory, Joanna  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPineda, Jesus  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSolow, Andrew R.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-04-04T19:30:17Z
dc.date.available2013-04-04T19:30:17Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-12
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5837
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2012. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Inter-Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marien Ecology Progress Series 476 (2013): 141-151, doi:10.3354/meps10186.en_US
dc.description.abstractGravid adults of the common intertidal barnacle Semibalanus balanoides (L.) brood fully developed larvae until individuals perceive some cue from the environment that triggers synchronous larval release. The prevailing hypothesis has been that phytoplankton blooms trigger release because they provide a food source for nauplius larvae. Through observations and field experiments, we tested the hypothesis that turbidity from any source, not just phytoplankton blooms, can trigger release. We documented five larval release events at three sites in the northeastern United States. Two events coincided with chlorophyll increases, and all five coincided with turbidity increases. In experiments, the larval release response was equivalent when adults were exposed to diatoms or inert synthetic beads, and it was significantly higher than under exposure to filtered seawater. We also tested the hypothesis that turbidity can decrease the risk of cannibalism for newly-released nauplii. Under experimentally manipulated conditions, adults consumed significantly fewer nauplii in a high-turbidity environment. We suggest that reproduction in this species may have evolved to coincide roughly with the local onset of winter/spring phytoplankton blooms, but the timing of larval release may have been fine-tuned further by cannibalism and predation pressures. The potential for turbid conditions to serve as a refuge for planktonic larvae of other marine organisms merits further investigation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for this work came from a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and a student award from the Coastal Ocean Institute at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (both to JG).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/meps10186
dc.subjectSynchronyen_US
dc.subjectTurbidityen_US
dc.subjectReproductionen_US
dc.subjectLarvaeen_US
dc.subjectCannibalismen_US
dc.subjectBarnaclesen_US
dc.titleTurbidity triggers larval release by the intertidal barnacle Semibalanus balanoidesen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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