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dc.contributor.authorLongworth, Brett E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Laura F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRoberts, Mark L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBeaupre, Steven R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBurke, Andrea  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJenkins, William J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-19T19:52:23Z
dc.date.available2013-02-19T19:52:23Z
dc.date.issued2012-04-17
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5772
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2012. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B: Beam Interactions with Materials and Atoms 294 (2013): 328-334, doi:10.1016/j.nimb.2012.05.014.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper describes a technique for measuring the 14C content of carbonate samples by producing C-ions directly in the negative ion sputter source of an accelerator mass spectrometer (AMS) system. This direct analysis of carbonate material eliminates the time and expense of graphite preparation. Powdered carbonate is mixed with titanium powder, loaded into a target cartridge, and compressed. Beam currents for optimally sized carbonate targets (0.09-0.15 mg C) are typically 10-20% of those produced by optimally-sized graphite targets (0.5-1 mg C). Modern (>0.8 Fm) samples run by this method have standard deviations of 0.009 Fm or less, and near-modern samples run as unknowns agree with values from traditional hydrolysis/graphite to better than 2%. Targets with as little as 0.06 mg carbonate produce useable ion currents and results, albeit with increased error and larger blank. In its current state, direct sputtering is best applied to problems where a large number of analyses with lower precision are required. These applications could include age surveys of deep-sea corals for determination of historic population dynamics, to identify samples that would benefit from high precision analysis, and for growth rate studies of organisms forming carbonate skeletons.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by a WHOI Mellon Interdisciplinary award, NSF NOSAMS cooperative agreement, and NSF OPP #s 0944474 and 0902957.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.nimb.2012.05.014
dc.titleCarbonate as sputter target material for rapid 14C AMSen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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