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dc.contributor.authorAharonov, Einat  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-17T19:28:13Z
dc.date.available2013-01-17T19:28:13Z
dc.date.issued1996-02
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5723
dc.descriptionSubmitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution February 1996en_US
dc.description.abstractThis thesis studies how rocks evolve due to the coupled effects of flow and chemical reaction. The study was motivated by various experimental observations, both in igneous and sedimentary rocks. In the first part of this thesis, growth of microscopic, pore-scale, features in sedimentary rocks is theoretically investigated. It is found, in agreement with experiments, that statistical properties of pore-grain interfaces mirror growth conditions. The shapes of pore-grain intrefaces both influence and are influenced by large-scale transport properties of the rock. The second part of this thesis employs analytical methods to study flow patterns in melt upwelling beneath mid-ocean ridges. It is shown that high permeability channels spontaneously form, allowing for efficient extraction of melt from the system. This result may aid in understanding existing geochemical and geological observations. In the third part of this thesis, I present a new 3D computer model that simulates flow and reaction through a porous matrix. The model is used to study and compare the different characteristics of dissolution and deposition, and to simulate different settings for melt upwelling in the mantle.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by NSF Grants 9218819-EAR, OCE-9314013 and the sponsors of the MIT Porous Flow Project.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherMassachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesWHOI Thesesen_US
dc.subjectFluid mechanicsen_US
dc.subjectSolidsen_US
dc.subjectSurface chemistryen_US
dc.subjectSurfacesen_US
dc.subjectPetrologyen_US
dc.titleSolid-fluid interactions in porous media : processes that form rocksen_US
dc.typeThesisen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1575/1912/5723


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