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dc.contributor.authorStreet, Lorna E.
dc.contributor.authorShaver, Gaius R.
dc.contributor.authorRastetter, Edward B.
dc.contributor.authorvan Wijk, Mark T.
dc.contributor.authorKaye, Brooke A.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Mathew
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T21:19:04Z
dc.date.available2012-11-27T21:19:04Z
dc.date.issued2012-01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1912/5583
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2012. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of John Wiley & Sons for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Global Change Biology 18 (2012): 2838–2852, doi:10.1111/j.1365-2486.2012.02754.x.en_US
dc.description.abstractArctic vegetation is characterized by high spatial variability in plant functional type (PFT) composition and gross primary productivity (P). Despite this variability, the two main drivers of P in sub-Arctic tundra are leaf area index (LT) and total foliar nitrogen (NT). LT and NT have been shown to be tightly coupled across PFTs in sub-Arctic tundra vegetation, which simplifies up-scaling by allowing quantification of the main drivers of P from remotely sensed LT. Our objective was to test the LT–NT relationship across multiple Arctic latitudes and to assess LT as a predictor of P for the pan-Arctic. Including PFT-specific parameters in models of LT–NT coupling provided only incremental improvements in model fit, but significant improvements were gained from including site-specific parameters. The degree of curvature in the LT–NT relationship, controlled by a fitted canopy nitrogen extinction co-efficient, was negatively related to average levels of diffuse radiation at a site. This is consistent with theoretical predictions of more uniform vertical canopy N distributions under diffuse light conditions. Higher latitude sites had higher average leaf N content by mass (NM), and we show for the first time that LT–NT coupling is achieved across latitudes via canopy-scale trade-offs between NM and leaf mass per unit leaf area (LM). Site-specific parameters provided small but significant improvements in models of P based on LT and moss cover. Our results suggest that differences in LT–NT coupling between sites could be used to improve pan-Arctic models of P and we provide unique evidence that prevailing radiation conditions can significantly affect N allocation over regional scales.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by grants from the US National Science Foundation to the Marine Biological Laboratory including grants # OPP-0352897, DEB-0423385, and DEB-0444592.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2486.2012.02754.x
dc.subjectCarbon balanceen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectGross primary productionen_US
dc.subjectDiffuse radiationen_US
dc.subjectTundra vegetationen_US
dc.subjectCO2 fluxen_US
dc.subjectSpecific leaf areaen_US
dc.subjectLight extinctionen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen extinctionen_US
dc.titleIncident radiation and the allocation of nitrogen within Arctic plant canopies : implications for predicting gross primary productivityen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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