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Determining timescales of natural carbonation of peridotite in the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman

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dc.contributor.author Mervine, Evelyn M.
dc.coverage.spatial Sultanate of Oman
dc.date.accessioned 2012-07-26T19:03:38Z
dc.date.available 2012-07-26T19:03:38Z
dc.date.issued 2012-06
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/1912/5279
dc.description Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution June 2012 en_US
dc.description.abstract Determining timescales of the formation and preservation of carbonate alteration products in mantle peridotite is important in order to better understand the role of this potentially important sink in the global carbon cycle and also to evaluate the feasibility of using artificially-enhanced, in situ formation of carbonates in peridotite to mitigate the buildup of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the atmosphere. Timescales of natural carbonation of peridotite were investigated in the mantle layer of the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman. Rates of ongoing, low-temperature CO2 uptake were estimated through 14C and 230Th dating of carbonate alteration products. Approximately 1-3 x 106 kg CO2/yr is sequestered in Ca-rich surface travertines and approximately 107 kg CO2/yr is sequestered in Mg-rich carbonate veins. Rates of CO2 removal were estimated through calculation of maximum erosion rates from cosmogenic 3He measurements in partiallyserpentinized peridotite bedrock associated with carbonate alteration products. Maximum erosion rates for serpentinized peridotite bedrock are ~5 to 180 m/Myr (average: ~40 m/Myr), which removes at most 105-106 kg CO2/yr through erosion of Mg-rich carbonate veins. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship My PhD thesis research was funded by the National Science Foundation grant EAR-1049281, the Deep Ocean Exploration Institute at WHOI, the Academic Programs Office at WHOI, and the Mellon Foundation. en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.publisher Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries WHOI Theses en_US
dc.subject Carbon dioxide sinks en_US
dc.subject Peridotite en_US
dc.title Determining timescales of natural carbonation of peridotite in the Samail Ophiolite, Sultanate of Oman en_US
dc.type Thesis en_US
dc.identifier.doi 10.1575/1912/5279


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