Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorChen, Shih-Nan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGeyer, W. Rockwell  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRalston, David K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLerczak, James A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-26T17:49:22Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:24Z
dc.date.issued2012-05
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Physical Oceanography 42 (2012): 748–763en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5241
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2012. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Physical Oceanography 42 (2012): 748–763, doi:10.1175/JPO-D-11-086.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractIsohaline coordinate analysis is used to compare the exchange flow in two contrasting estuaries, the long (with respect to tidal excursion) Hudson River and the short Merrimack River, using validated numerical models. The isohaline analysis averages fluxes in salinity space rather than in physical space, yielding the isohaline exchange flow that incorporates both subtidal and tidal fluxes and precisely satisfies the Knudsen relation. The isohaline analysis can be consistently applied to both subtidally and tidally dominated estuaries. In the Hudson, the isohaline exchange flow is similar to results from the Eulerian analysis, and the conventional estuarine theory can be used to quantify the salt transport based on scaling with the baroclinic pressure gradient. In the Merrimack, the isohaline exchange flow is much larger than the Eulerian quantity, indicating the dominance of tidal salt flux. The exchange flow does not scale with the baroclinic pressure gradient but rather with tidal volume flux. This tidal exchange is driven by tidal pumping due to the jet–sink flow at the mouth constriction, leading to a linear dependence of exchange flow on tidal volume flux. Finally, a tidal conversion parameter Qin/Qprism, measuring the fraction of tidal inflow Qprism that is converted into net exchange Qin, is proposed to characterize the exchange processes among different systems. It is found that the length scale ratio between tidal excursion and salinity intrusion provides a characteristic to distinguish estuarine regimes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipSNC is supported by a WHOI postdoctoral scholarship, a NSF Grant OCE-0926427, and a Taiwan National Science Council Grant NSC 100- 2199-M-002-028.WRGis supported byNSFGrantOCE- 0926427. JAL is supported by NSF Grant OCE-0452054.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JPO-D-11-086.1
dc.subjectCoastal flowsen_US
dc.titleEstuarine exchange flow quantified with isohaline coordinates : contrasting long and short estuariesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2012-11-01en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JPO-D-11-086.1


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record