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dc.contributor.authorMcMahon, Kara G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorReilly-Raska, L. K.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSiegmann, William L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLynch, James F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDuda, Timothy F.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-26T18:53:10Z
dc.date.available2012-03-26T18:53:10Z
dc.date.issued2012-02
dc.identifier.citationJournal of the Acoustical Society of America 131 (2012): 1689-1700en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5102
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Acoustical Society of America, 2012. This article is posted here by permission of Acoustical Society of America for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 131 (2012): 1689-1700, doi:10.1121/1.3666004.en_US
dc.description.abstractExperimental observations and theoretical studies show that nonlinear internal waves occur widely in shallow water and cause acoustic propagation effects including ducting and mode coupling. Horizontal ducting results when acoustic modes travel between internal wave fronts that form waveguide boundaries. For small grazing angles between a mode trajectory and a front, an interference pattern may arise that is a horizontal Lloyd mirror pattern. An analytic description for this feature is provided along with comparisons between results from the formulated model predicting a horizontal Lloyd mirror pattern and an adiabatic mode parabolic equation. Different waveguide models are considered, including boxcar and jump sound speed profiles where change in sound speed is assumed 12 m/s. Modifications to the model are made to include multiple and moving fronts. The focus of this analysis is on different front locations relative to the source as well as on the number of fronts and their curvatures and speeds. Curvature influences mode incidence angles and thereby changes the interference patterns. For sources oriented so that the front appears concave, the areas with interference patterns shrink as curvature increases, while convexly oriented fronts cause patterns to expand.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors thank the Office of Naval Research for funding this work. Additionally, the first author is supported through an ONR Ocean Acoustics Traineeship.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAcoustical Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1121/1.3666004
dc.subjectAcoustic waveguidesen_US
dc.subjectNonlinear acousticsen_US
dc.subjectUnderwater acoustic propagationen_US
dc.titleHorizontal Lloyd mirror patterns from straight and curved nonlinear internal wavesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1121/1.3666004


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