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dc.contributor.authorSchmitt, Raymond W.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2012-03-09T14:57:11Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-24
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Fluid Mechanics 692 (2012): 1-4en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5077
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Cambridge University Press, 2012. This article is posted here by permission of Cambridge University Press for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Fluid Mechanics 692 (2012): 1-4, doi:10.1017/jfm.2011.468.en_US
dc.description.abstractSalt fingers are a form of double-diffusive convection that can occur in a wide variety of fluid systems, ranging from stellar interiors and oceans to magma chambers. Their amplitude has long been difficult to quantify, and a variety of mechanisms have been proposed. Radko & Smith (J. Fluid Mech., this issue, vol. 692, 2012, pp. 5–27) have developed a new theory that balances the basic growth rate with that of secondary instabilities that act on the finite amplitude fingers. Their approach promises a way forward for computationally challenging systems with vastly different scales of decay for momentum, heat and dissolved substances.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1017/jfm.2011.468
dc.subjectDouble diffusive convectionen_US
dc.subjectInstabilityen_US
dc.subjectOcean processesen_US
dc.titleFinger puzzlesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2013-01-24
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/jfm.2011.468


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