Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDrake, Deanne C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Bruce J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDeegan, Linda A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Lora A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMiller, E. E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWarren, R. Scott  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-16T20:01:09Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2008-02-07
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series 354 (2008): 35-46en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5041
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Inter-Research, 2008. This article is posted here by permission of Inter-Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marine Ecology Progress Series 354 (2008): 35-46, doi:10.3354/meps07170.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe examined the effects of increased nutrient availability on nitrogen (N) dynamics in dominant New England salt marsh plants (tall and stunted Spartina alterniflora and S. patens) using paired large-scale nutrient and 15NO3– tracer additions. This study is one component of a long-term, large-scale, salt marsh nutrient and trophic manipulation study (the Trophic Cascades and Interacting Control Processes in a Detritus-based Aquatic Ecosystem [TIDE] Project). We compared physiological variables of plants in fertilized (~17× ambient N and P in incoming tidal water) and reference marsh systems to quantify NO3– uptake and uptake efficiency, allocation of N to tissues, end-of-season N resorption, leaf litter quality and other potential responses to increased nutrient availability. Reference system plants sequestered ~24.5 g NO3-N ha–1 d–1 in aboveground pools during mid-summer, while fertilized plants sequestered ~140 g NO3-N ha–1 d–1. However, NO3– uptake efficiency (% of total incoming NO3-N sequestered aboveground) was higher in the reference system (16.8%) than in the fertilized system (2.6%), suggesting that our fertilization rate (~70 µM NO3– in incoming water) approaches or exceeds the uptake saturation point for this vegetation community. Leaf litter quality was clearly affected by N availability; N resorption efficiency was lower in all plants of the fertilized system; senesced leaves from the fertilized creek contained ~43% (tall S. alterniflora), 23% (stunted S. alterniflora) and 15% (S. patens) more N per unit biomass than reference creek leaves.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by National Science Foundation Grant DEB 0213767 and OCE 9726921.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherInter-Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/meps07170
dc.subjectSpartina alternifloraen_US
dc.subjectSpartina patensen_US
dc.subjectPlant ecophysiologyen_US
dc.subjectEutrophicationen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen isotopesen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen cyclingen_US
dc.subjectMarsh ecosystemen_US
dc.titlePlant nitrogen dynamics in fertilized and natural New England salt marshes : a paired 15N tracer studyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2013-02-07
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps07170


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record