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dc.contributor.authorKarnauskas, Kristopher B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Gregory C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMurtugudde, Raghu  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-15T17:31:53Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:57:25Z
dc.date.issued2012-01-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Climate 25 (2012): 343–349en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/5029
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2012. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Climate 25 (2012): 343–349, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00059.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) is a major component of the tropical Pacific Ocean circulation. EUC velocity in most global climate models is sluggish relative to observations. Insufficient ocean resolution slows the EUC in the eastern Pacific where nonlinear terms should dominate the zonal momentum balance. A slow EUC in the east creates a bottleneck for the EUC to the west. However, this bottleneck does not impair other major components of the tropical circulation, including upwelling and poleward transport. In most models, upwelling velocity and poleward transport divergence fall within directly estimated uncertainties. Both of these transports play a critical role in a theory for how the tropical Pacific may change under increased radiative forcing, that is, the ocean dynamical thermostat mechanism. These findings suggest that, in the mean, global climate models may not underrepresent the role of equatorial ocean circulation, nor perhaps bias the balance between competing mechanisms for how the tropical Pacific might change in the future. Implications for model improvement under higher resolution are also discussed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipKBK gratefully acknowledges the J. Lamar Worzel Assistant Scientist Fund. GCJ is supported by NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. RM gratefully acknowledges the generous support and hospitality of the Divecha Centre for Climate Change and CAOS at IISc, Bangalore, and partial support by NASA PO grants.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00059.1
dc.subjectTropicsen_US
dc.subjectOcean circulationen_US
dc.subjectOcean dynamicsen_US
dc.subjectClimate modelsen_US
dc.subjectCoupled modelsen_US
dc.subjectOcean modelsen_US
dc.titleAn equatorial ocean bottleneck in global climate modelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2012-07-01
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00059.1


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