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dc.contributor.authorLaske, Gabi  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMarkee, Amanda  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOrcutt, John A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWolfe, Cecily J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCollins, John A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSolomon, Sean C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDetrick, Robert S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBercovici, David  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHauri, Erik H.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-21T14:16:55Z
dc.date.available2011-12-21T14:16:55Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-31
dc.identifier.citationGeophysical Journal International 187 (2011): 1725–1742en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4952
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2011. This article is posted here by permission of John Wiley & Sons for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geophysical Journal International 187 (2011): 1725–1742, doi:10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05238.x.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe present models of the 3-D shear velocity structure of the lithosphere and asthenosphere beneath the Hawaiian hotspot and surrounding region. The models are derived from long-period Rayleigh-wave phase velocities that were obtained from the analysis of seismic recordings collected during two year-long deployments for the Hawaiian Plume-Lithosphere Undersea Mantle Experiment. For this experiment, broad-band seismic sensors were deployed at nearly 70 seafloor sites as well as 10 sites on the Hawaiian Islands. Our seismic images result from a two-step inversion of path-averaged dispersion curves using the two-station method. The images reveal an asymmetry in shear velocity structure with respect to the island chain, most notably in the lower lithosphere at depths of 60 km and greater, and in the asthenosphere. An elongated, 100-km-wide and 300-km-long low-velocity anomaly reaches to depths of at least 140 km. At depths of 60 km and shallower, the lowest velocities are found near the northern end of the island of Hawaii. No major velocity anomalies are found to the south or southeast of Hawaii, at any depth. The low-velocity anomaly in the asthenosphere is consistent with an excess temperature of 200–250 °C and partial melt at the level of a few percent by volume, if we assume that compositional variations as a result of melt extraction play a minor role. We also image small-scale low-velocity anomalies within the lithosphere that may be associated with the volcanic fields surrounding the Hawaiian Islands.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was financed by the National Science Foundation under grants OCE-00-02470 and OCE-00-02819. Markee was partly sponsored by a SIO graduate student fellowship.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sonsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05238.x
dc.subjectMantle processesen_US
dc.subjectSurface waves and free oscillationsen_US
dc.subjectSeismic tomographyen_US
dc.subjectOceanic hotspots and intraplate volcanismen_US
dc.subjectPacific Oceanen_US
dc.titleAsymmetric shallow mantle structure beneath the Hawaiian Swell—evidence from Rayleigh waves recorded by the PLUME networken_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-246X.2011.05238.x


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