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dc.contributor.authorJiang, Mingshun  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Meng  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLibby, Scott P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Donald M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-12-20T14:47:03Z
dc.date.available2011-12-20T14:47:03Z
dc.date.issued2011-08-18
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4945
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Deep Sea Research Part I: Oceanographic Research Papers 58 (2011): 1130-1146, doi:10.1016/j.dsr.2011.08.009.en_US
dc.description.abstractObservations and numerical modeling indicate that a mesoscale anti-cyclonic eddy formed south of Cape Ann at the northern entrance of Massachusetts Bay (MB) during May 2005, when large river discharges in the western Gulf of Maine and two strong Nor’easters passing through the regions led to an unprecedented toxic Alexandrium fundyense bloom (red tide). Both model results and field measurements suggest that the western Maine coastal current separated from Cape Ann around May 7-8, and the eddy formed on around May 10. The eddy was trapped at the formation location for about a week before detaching from the coastline and moving slowly southward on May 17. Both model results and theoretical analysis suggest that the separation of the coastal current from the coast and subsequent eddy formation were initiated at the subsurface by an adverse pressure gradient between Cape Ann and MB due to the higher sea level set up by onshore Ekman transport and higher density in downstream MB. After the formation, the eddy was maintained by the input of vorticity transported by the coastal current from the north, and local vorticity generation around the cape by the horizontal gradients of wind-driven currents, bottom stress, and water density induced by the Merrimack River plume. Observations and model results indicate that the anti-cyclonic eddy significantly changed the pathway of nutrient and biota transport into the coastal areas and enhanced phytoplankton including Alexandrium abundances around the perimeter of the eddy and in the western coast of MB.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMJ was partially supported by the MWRA for this work. Support for DMA and many of the cruise observations was provided by the GOMTOX project through NOAA Grant NA06NOS4780245. Additional cruise support came from NSF grant OCE-0430724, DMS-0417769 and NIEHS grant 1P50-ES01274201 (Woods Hole Center for Oceans and Human Health) and through NOAA ECOHAB Grant NA09NOS4780193.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.dsr.2011.08.009
dc.subjectMesoscale eddyen_US
dc.subjectHeadlanden_US
dc.subjectCape Annen_US
dc.subjectGulf of Maineen_US
dc.subjectMassachusetts Bayen_US
dc.subjectMerrimack Riveren_US
dc.subjectFreshwater plumeen_US
dc.subjectSub-mesoscale filamentsen_US
dc.subjectAlexandrium fundyenseen_US
dc.subjectHarmful algal bloomen_US
dc.subjectRed tideen_US
dc.titleDynamics of a mesoscale eddy off Cape Ann, Massachusetts in May 2005en_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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