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dc.contributor.authorBowen, Jennifer L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWard, Bess B.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, Hilary G.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHobbie, John E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorValiela, Ivan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDeegan, Linda A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSogin, Mitchell L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-30T16:26:58Z
dc.date.available2011-11-30T16:26:58Z
dc.date.issued2010-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4909
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2010. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Nature Publishing Group for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in The ISME Journal 5 (2011): 1540–1548, doi:10.1038/ismej.2011.22.en_US
dc.description.abstractFunctional redundancy in bacterial communities is expected to allow microbial assemblages to survive perturbation by allowing continuity in function despite compositional changes in communities. Recent evidence suggests, however, that microbial communities change both composition and function as a result of disturbance. We present evidence for a third response: resistance. We examined microbial community response to perturbation caused by nutrient enrichment in salt marsh sediments using deep pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional gene microarrays targeting the nirS gene. Composition of the microbial community, as demonstrated by both genes, was unaffected by significant variations in external nutrient supply, despite demonstrable and diverse nutrient–induced changes in many aspects of marsh ecology. The lack of response to external forcing demonstrates a remarkable uncoupling between microbial composition and ecosystem-level biogeochemical processes and suggests that sediment microbial communities are able to resist some forms of perturbation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this research came from NSF(DEB-0717155 to JEH, DBI-0400819 to JLB). Support for the sequencing facility came from NIH and NSF (NIH/NIEHS-P50-ES012742-01 and NSF/OCE 0430724-J Stegeman PI to HGM and MLS, and WM Keck Foundation to MLS). Salary support provided from Princeton University Council on Science and Technology to JLB. Support for development of the functional gene microarray provided by NSF/OCE99-081482 to BBW. The Plum Island fertilization experiment was funded by NSF (DEB 0213767 and DEB 0816963).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/ismej.2011.22
dc.titleMicrobial community composition in sediments resists perturbation by nutrient enrichmenten_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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