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dc.contributor.authorSchulz, Eric W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGrosenbaugh, Mark A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPender, L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGreenslade, D. J. M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTrull, Thomas W.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-28T16:09:14Z
dc.date.available2012-04-01T08:32:54Z
dc.date.issued2011-10-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 28 (2011): 1351–1360en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4898
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2011. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 28 (2011): 1351–1360, doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-10-05033.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Southern Ocean Flux Station was deployed near 47°S, 140°E. The extreme wind and wave conditions at this location require appropriate mooring design, which includes dynamic fatigue analysis and static analysis. An accurate estimate of the wave conditions was essential. A motion reference unit was deployed in a nearby test mooring for 6 months. The motion data provided estimates of significant wave height that agreed well with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology wave model, increasing confidence in the model performance in the Southern Ocean. The results of the dynamic fatigue analysis using three input wave datasets and implications for the mooring design are described. The design analysis predicts the fatigue life for critical mooring components and guided the final selection of links and chain shackles. The three input wave climatologies do not differ greatly, and this is reflected in minimal changes to mooring components for each of the fatigue analyses.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMany years of logistic support for these deployments have been provided by the Australian Marine National Facility and the Australian Antarctic Sciences program (Award 1156). IMOS is funded through the Federal Government’s National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy and the Super Science Initiative.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH-D-10-05033.1
dc.subjectBuoy observationsen_US
dc.titleMooring design using wave-state estimate from the Southern Oceanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JTECH-D-10-05033.1


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