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dc.contributor.authorAruda, Amalia M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBaumgartner, Mark F.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorReitzel, Adam M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Ann M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-14T19:05:44Z
dc.date.available2011-09-14T19:05:44Z
dc.date.issued2011-03
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4810
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Insect Physiology 57 (2011): 665-675, doi:10.1016/j.jinsphys.2011.03.007.en_US
dc.description.abstractCalanoid copepods, such as Calanus finmarchicus, are a key component of marine food webs. C. finmarchicus undergoes a facultative diapause during juvenile development, which profoundly affects their seasonal distribution and availability to their predators. The current ignorance of how copepod diapause is regulated limits understanding of copepod population dynamics, distribution, and ecosystem interactions. Heat shock proteins (Hsps) are a superfamily of molecular chaperones characteristically upregulated in response to stress conditions and frequently associated with diapause in other taxa. In this study, 8 heat shock proteins were identified in C. finmarchicus C5 copepodids (Hsp21, Hsp22, p26, Hsp90, and 4 forms of Hsp70), and expression of these transcripts was characterized in response to handling stress and in association with diapause. Hsp21, Hsp22, and Hsp70A (cytosolic subfamily) were induced by handling stress. Expression of Hsp70A was also elevated in shallow active copepodids relative to deep diapausing copepodids, which may reflect induction of this gene by varied stressors in active animals. In contrast, expression of Hsp22 was elevated in deep diapausing animals; Hsp22 may play a role both in short-term stress responses and in protecting proteins from degradation during diapause. Expression of most of the Hsps examined did not vary in response to diapause, perhaps because the diapause of C. finmarchicus is not associated with the extreme environmental conditions (e.g., freezing, desiccation) experienced by many other taxa, such as overwintering insects or Artemia cysts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for AMA was provided by the WHOI Summer Student Fellowship Program and an EPA STAR fellowship.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.jinsphys.2011.03.007
dc.subjectCopepoden_US
dc.subjectCrustaceanen_US
dc.subjectDiapauseen_US
dc.subjectHeat shock proteinen_US
dc.subjectStress responseen_US
dc.titleHeat shock protein expression during stress and diapause in the marine copepod Calanus finmarchicusen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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