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dc.contributor.authorMohtadi, Mahyar  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorOppo, Delia W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSteinke, Stephan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorStuut, Jan-Berend W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDe Pol-Holz, Ricardo  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHebbeln, Dierk  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLuckge, Andreas  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-19T13:39:31Z
dc.date.available2012-01-24T09:31:23Z
dc.date.issued2011-06
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4766
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2011. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Nature Publishing Group for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Nature Geoscience 4 (2011): 540–544, doi:10.1038/ngeo1209.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Australian-Indonesian monsoon is an important component of the climate system in the tropical Indo-Pacific region. However, its past variability, relation with northern and southern high latitude climate and connection to the other Asian monsoon systems are poorly understood. Here we present high-resolution records of monsoon-controlled austral winter upwelling during the past 22,000 years, based on planktic foraminiferal oxygen isotope and faunal composition in a sedimentary archive collected offshore southern Java. We show that glacial-interglacial variations in the Australian-Indonesian winter monsoon were in phase with the Indian summer monsoon system, consistent with their modern linkage through cross-equatorial surface winds. Likewise, millennial-scale variability of upwelling shares similar sign and timing with upwelling variability in the Arabian Sea. On the basis of element composition and grain-size distribution as precipitation-sensitive proxies in the same archive, we infer that (austral) summer monsoon rainfall was highest during the Bølling-Allerød period and the past 2,500 years. Our results indicate drier conditions during Heinrich Stadial 1 due to a southward shift of summer rainfall and a relatively weak Hadley Cell south of the Equator. We suggest that the Australian-Indonesian summer and winter monsoon variability were closely linked to summer insolation and abrupt climate changes in the northern hemisphere.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the German Bundesministerium für Bildung und Forschung (PABESIA) and the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG, HE 3412/15-1). DWO’s participation was funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1209
dc.titleGlacial to Holocene swings of the Australian–Indonesian monsoonen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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