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dc.contributor.authorSitch, Stephen  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, A. David  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKimball, John S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGedney, Nicola  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGamon, John  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorEngstrom, Ryan  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWolf, Annett  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorZhuang, Qianlai  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorClein, Joy S.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Kyle C.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-21T14:17:03Z
dc.date.available2011-07-21T14:17:03Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.citationEcological Applications 17 (2007): 213–234en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4708
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Ecological Society of America, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of Ecological Society of America for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Ecological Applications 17 (2007): 213–234, doi:10.1890/1051-0761(2007)017[0213:ATCBOC]2.0.CO;2.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper reviews the current status of using remote sensing and process-based modeling approaches to assess the contemporary and future circumpolar carbon balance of Arctic tundra, including the exchange of both carbon dioxide and methane with the atmosphere. Analyses based on remote sensing approaches that use a 20-year data record of satellite data indicate that tundra is greening in the Arctic, suggesting an increase in photosynthetic activity and net primary production. Modeling studies generally simulate a small net carbon sink for the distribution of Arctic tundra, a result that is within the uncertainty range of field-based estimates of net carbon exchange. Applications of process-based approaches for scenarios of future climate change generally indicate net carbon sequestration in Arctic tundra as enhanced vegetation production exceeds simulated increases in decomposition. However, methane emissions are likely to increase dramatically, in response to rising soil temperatures, over the next century. Key uncertainties in the response of Arctic ecosystems to climate change include uncertainties in future fire regimes and uncertainties relating to changes in the soil environment. These include the response of soil decomposition and respiration to warming and deepening of the soil active layer, uncertainties in precipitation and potential soil drying, and distribution of wetlands. While there are numerous uncertainties in the projections of process-based models, they generally indicate that Arctic tundra will be a small sink for carbon over the next century and that methane emissions will increase considerably, which implies that exchange of greenhouse gases between the atmosphere and Arctic tundra ecosystems is likely to contribute to climate warming.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFATE project under the International Arctic Science Committee and the National Science Foundation through the International Arctic Research Centre in Fairbanks. Nicola Gedney was supported by the U.K. Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs under the Climate Prediction Programme PECD/7/12/37.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherEcological Society of Americaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1890/1051-0761(2007)017[0213:ATCBOC]2.0.CO;2
dc.subjectArctic carbon cycleen_US
dc.subjectBiogeochemical cyclesen_US
dc.subjectCarbon balanceen_US
dc.subjectCarbon cycle modelingen_US
dc.subjectHigh-latitude remote sensingen_US
dc.subjectMethane modelingen_US
dc.subjectTundraen_US
dc.titleAssessing the carbon balance of circumpolar Arctic tundra using remote sensing and process modelingen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1890/1051-0761(2007)017[0213:ATCBOC]2.0.CO;2


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