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dc.contributor.authorJi, Rubao  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFranks, Peter J. S.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-04-26T14:17:12Z
dc.date.available2012-01-01T09:30:25Z
dc.date.issued2007-08-23
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series 344 (2007): 49-61en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4519
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Inter-Research, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of Inter-Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Marine Ecology Progress Series 344 (2007): 49-61, doi:10.3354/meps06952.en_US
dc.description.abstractDinoflagellates demonstrate a variety of vertical migration patterns that presumably give them a competitive advantage when nutrients are depleted in the surface layer of stratified waters. In this study, a simple quota-based model was used to examine the relationships between the vertical migration pattern and internal nutritional status, and to assess how external environmental conditions, such as mixing layer depth (MLD) and internal waves, can influence these relationships. Dinoflagellates may form subsurface aggregations or conduct vertical migration (diel or non-diel) in response to their internal nutrient quota, but within a limited physiological parameter space. The model was implemented in a 1D (vertical) domain using an individual-based modeling approach, tracking the change in nutrient quota and the trajectory of many individual cells in a water column. The model shows that dinoflagellate cells might change from one vertical migration pattern to another when the external environmental conditions change. Using the average net growth rate as an index of fitness, 2 migration strategies, photo-/geotaxis vs. quota-based migration, were assessed with regard to MLD and internal wave regime. It was found that dinoflagellates might choose different migration strategies under different mixing/stratification regimes. In addition, under the same environmental conditions, different species might display unique vertical migration patterns due to inherent physiological differences. This study reveals the sensitivity of dinoflagellate vertical migration to biological and physical factors and offers possible explanations for the various vertical distributions and migration patterns observed in the field.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipR.J. received support from the WHOI Penzance Assistant Scientist Fund and NOAA grant NA- 17RJ1223. The support for P.J.S.F. was from NSF grant OCE0220379 and ONR grant N00014-06-0304.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInter-Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3354/meps06952
dc.subjectDinoflagellatesen_US
dc.subjectVertical migrationen_US
dc.subjectModelen_US
dc.subjectNitrogen quotaen_US
dc.titleVertical migration of dinoflagellates : model analysis of strategies, growth, and vertical distribution patternsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps06952


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