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dc.contributor.authorBrink, Kenneth H.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-17T20:29:01Z
dc.date.available2011-03-17T20:29:01Z
dc.date.issued2010-05-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Marine Research 68 (2010): 337-368en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4405
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Sears Foundation for Marine Research, 2010. This article is posted here by permission of Sears Foundation for Marine Research for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Marine Research 68 (2010): 337-368, doi:10.1357/002224010794657209.en_US
dc.description.abstractBarotropic current rectification by topographic irregularities is treated for a case with bottom friction and fluctuating forcing. Geometries both with underlying shelf-slope topography and with no mean topographic slope are considered. In common with many previous studies of this sort, the resulting time-mean flow roughly follows isobaths in the direction that long topographic Rossby waves travel, but the mean flow often deviates locally from this rule. Further, as might be expected, there is an area-averaged correlation of pressure and bottom slope in the sense that would propel the mean flow. If the topographic irregularities have a length scale shorter than roughly a particle fluctuation excursion, then the typical along-isobath mean flow is proportional to the bottom slope, the irregularity length scale, the amplitude of the cross-isobath velocity fluctuations, and the inverse of the water depth. If the spatial scale of the irregularities is greater than roughly a particle excursion, then the resulting mean flow does not depend on irregularity length scale, but does depend on the Coriolis parameter, the bottom slope, cross-isobath velocity squared, the inverse depth and the inverse frequency squared. For large amplitude fluctuations, eddy momentum transport leads to a further inverse proportionality of mean flow to the strength of bottom friction. The overall mean flow parameterization holds only in a statistical sense (as opposed to point-by-point) because of the spatial complexity of typical flows. In a forced, dissipative system, the mean flow generation is often just tidal rectification (e.g., Loder, 1980) if the particle excursion is short relative to topographic scales. However, as the irregularity scale decreases, mean flow becomes weaker.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was sponsored by the Physical Oceanography Program at the National Science Foundation through grant OCE-0751731.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSears Foundation for Marine Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1357/002224010794657209
dc.titleTopographic rectification in a forced, dissipative, barotropic oceanen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1357/002224010794657209


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