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dc.contributor.authorFeddersen, Falk  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Albert J.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-29T17:21:58Z
dc.date.available2010-11-29T17:21:58Z
dc.date.issued2007-01
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 24 (2007): 102-116en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/4126
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 24 (2007): 102-116, doi:10.1175/JTECH1953.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractMeasurements of the vertical Reynolds stress components in the wave-dominated nearshore are required to diagnose momentum and turbulence dynamics. Removing wave bias from Reynolds stress estimates is critical to a successful diagnosis. Here two existing Reynolds stress estimation methods (those of Trowbridge, and Shaw and Trowbridge) for wave-dominated environments and an extended method (FW) that is a combination of the two are tested with a vertical array of three current meters deployed in 3.2-m water depth off an ocean beach. During the 175-h-long experiment the instruments were seaward of the surfzone and the alongshore current was wind driven. Intercomparison of Reynolds stress methods reveals that the Trowbridge method is wave bias dominated. Tests of the integrated cospectra are used to reject bad Reynolds stress estimates, and the Shaw and Trowbridge estimates are rejected more often than FW estimates. With the FW method, wave bias remains apparent in the cross-shore component of the Reynolds stress. However, the alongshore component of Reynolds stress measured at the three current meters are related to each other with a vertically uniform first EOF containing 73% of the variance, indicating the presence of a constant stress layer. This is the first time the vertical structure of Reynolds stress has been measured in a wave-dominated environment. The Reynolds stress is, albeit weakly, related to the wind stress and a parameterized bottom stress. Using derived wave bias and bottom stress parameterizations, the effect of wave bias on Reynolds stress estimates is shown to be weaker for more typical surfzone conditions (with both stronger waves and currents than those observed here).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by NSF, ONR, and NOPP.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JTECH1953.1
dc.subjectWaves, oceanicen_US
dc.subjectStressen_US
dc.subjectSensorsen_US
dc.titleDirect estimation of the Reynolds stress vertical structure in the nearshoreen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JTECH1953.1


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