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dc.contributor.authorGalford, Gillian L.
dc.contributor.authorMelillo, Jerry M.
dc.contributor.authorMustard, John F.
dc.contributor.authorCerri, Carlos E. P.
dc.contributor.authorCerri, Carlos C.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-24T16:23:43Z
dc.date.available2011-04-28T08:24:47Z
dc.date.issued2010-10-28
dc.identifier.citationEarth Interactions 14 (2010): 1–24en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1912/4122
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2010. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Earth Interactions 14 (2010): 1–24, doi:10.1175/2010EI327.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Brazilian Amazon is one of the most rapidly developing agricultural frontiers in the world. The authors assess changes in cropland area and the intensification of cropping in the Brazilian agricultural frontier state of Mato Grosso using remote sensing and develop a greenhouse gas emissions budget. The most common type of intensification in this region is a shift from single- to double-cropping patterns and associated changes in management, including increased fertilization. Using the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor, the authors created a green-leaf phenology for 2001–06 that was temporally smoothed with a wavelet filter. The wavelet-smoothed green-leaf phenology was analyzed to detect cropland areas and their cropping patterns. The authors document cropland extensification and double-cropping intensification validated with field data with 85% accuracy for detecting croplands and 64% and 89% accuracy for detecting single- and double-cropping patterns, respectively. The results show that croplands more than doubled from 2001 to 2006 to cover about 100 000 km2 and that new double-cropping intensification occurred on over 20% of croplands. Variations are seen in the annual rates of extensification and double-cropping intensification. Greenhouse gas emissions are estimated for the period 2001–06 due to conversion of natural vegetation and pastures to row-crop agriculture in Mato Grosso averaged 179 Tg CO2-e yr−1, over half the typical fossil fuel emissions for the country in recent years.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship (G. L. Galford) and Large-Scale Biosphere Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia (Grant NNG06GE20A) and the Environmental Change Initiative at Brown University.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/2010EI327.1
dc.subjectCarbonen_US
dc.subjectDeforestationen_US
dc.subjectRemote sensingen_US
dc.subjectAgricultural intensificationen_US
dc.subjectSoybeanen_US
dc.subjectCerradoen_US
dc.titleThe Amazon frontier of land-use change : croplands and consequences for greenhouse gas emissionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/2010EI327.1


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