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dc.contributor.authorPatterson, David J.
dc.contributor.authorCooper, J.
dc.contributor.authorKirk, Paul M.
dc.contributor.authorPyle, R. L.
dc.contributor.authorRemsen, David P.
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-03T19:53:43Z
dc.date.available2010-11-03T19:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1912/4056
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © The Author(s), 2010. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Trends in Ecology & Evolution 25 (2010): 686-691, doi:10.1016/j.tree.2010.09.004.en_US
dc.description.abstractThose who seek answers to big, broad questions about biology, especially questions emphasizing the organism (taxonomy, evolution, ecology), will soon benefit from an emerging names-based infrastructure. It will draw on the almost universal association of organism names with biological information to index and interconnect information distributed across the Internet. The result will be a virtual data commons, expanding as further data are shared, allowing biology to become more of a “big science”. Informatics devices will exploit this ‘big new biology’, revitalizing comparative biology with a broad perspective to reveal previously inaccessible trends and discontinuities, so helping us to reveal unfamiliar biological truths. Here, we review the first components of this freely available, participatory, and semantic Global Names Architecture.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipDJP thanks the NSF for support through the Data Conservancy project and the Alfred P. Sloan and John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur foundations for their support.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.relation.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tree.2010.09.004
dc.titleNames are key to the big new biologyen_US
dc.typePreprinten_US


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