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dc.contributor.authorZemmelink, Hendrik J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorDacey, John W. H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHintsa, Eric J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcGillis, Wade R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGieskes, Winfried W. C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKlaassen, Wim  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorde Groot, Henk W.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBaar, Hein J. W. de  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-20T20:25:38Z
dc.date.available2010-07-20T20:25:38Z
dc.date.issued2004-06-30
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research 109 (2004): C08S10en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3803
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2004. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 109 (2004): C08S10, doi:10.1029/2003JC001795.en_US
dc.description.abstractGas transfer rates were determined from vertical profile measurements of atmospheric dimethylsulfide (DMS) gradients over the equatorial Pacific Ocean obtained during the GasEx-2001 cruise. A quadratic relationship between gas transfer velocity and wind speed was derived from the DMS flux measurements; this relationship was in close agreement with a parameterization derived from relaxed eddy accumulation measurements of DMS over the northeastern Pacific Ocean. However, the GasEx-2001 relationship results in gas transfer rates that are a factor 2 higher than gas transfer rates calculated from a parameterization that is based on coincident eddy correlation measurements of CO2 flux. The measurement precision of both the profiling and eddy correlation techniques applied during GasEx-2001 is comparable; the two gas transfer data sets are in agreement within their uncertainty. Differences in the number of samples and the wind speed range over which CO2 and DMS fluxes were measured are likely causes for the observed discrepancy.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding for this work came from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and from the NOP project 951203: ‘‘Micrometeorology of air/sea fluxes of carbon dioxide. This work was supported by the Global Carbon Cycle project of the NOAA Office of Global Programs grant NA17RJ1223, National Science Foundation grant OCE-9986724, and NSF grant ATM-0120569.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2003JC001795
dc.subjectDimethylsulfide (DMS)en_US
dc.subjectAtmospheric gradientsen_US
dc.subjectMicrometeorologyen_US
dc.subjectGasEx-2001en_US
dc.titleFluxes and gas transfer rates of the biogenic trace gas DMS derived from atmospheric gradientsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2003JC001795


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