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dc.contributor.authorMarinov, Irina  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFollows, Michael J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGnanadesikan, Anand  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, Jorge L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSlater, Richard D.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-16T19:41:39Z
dc.date.available2010-06-16T19:41:39Z
dc.date.issued2008-07-22
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research 113 (2008): C07032en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3663
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2008. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 113 (2008): C07032, doi:10.1029/2007JC004598.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the sensitivity of atmospheric pCO2 to changes in ocean biology that result in drawdown of nutrients at the ocean surface. We show that the global inventory of preformed nutrients is the key determinant of atmospheric pCO2 and the oceanic carbon storage due to the soft-tissue pump (OCS soft ). We develop a new theory showing that under conditions of perfect equilibrium between atmosphere and ocean, atmospheric pCO2 can be written as a sum of exponential functions of OCS soft . The theory also demonstrates how the sensitivity of atmospheric pCO2 to changes in the soft-tissue pump depends on the preformed nutrient inventory and on surface buffer chemistry. We validate our theory against simulations of nutrient depletion in a suite of realistic general circulation models (GCMs). The decrease in atmospheric pCO2 following surface nutrient depletion depends on the oceanic circulation in the models. Increasing deep ocean ventilation by increasing vertical mixing or Southern Ocean winds increases the atmospheric pCO2 sensitivity to surface nutrient forcing. Conversely, stratifying the Southern Ocean decreases the atmospheric CO2 sensitivity to surface nutrient depletion. Surface CO2 disequilibrium due to the slow gas exchange with the atmosphere acts to make atmospheric pCO2 more sensitive to nutrient depletion in high-ventilation models and less sensitive to nutrient depletion in low-ventilation models. Our findings have potentially important implications for both past and future climates.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipWhile at MIT, I.M. was supported by the NOAA Postdoctoral Program in Climate and Global Change, administered by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/postscript
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2007JC004598
dc.subjectCarbon cycleen_US
dc.subjectPreformed nutrienten_US
dc.subjectNutrient depletionen_US
dc.titleHow does ocean biology affect atmospheric pCO2? Theory and modelsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2007JC004598


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