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dc.contributor.authorGregg, Patricia M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBehn, Mark D.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLin, Jian  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGrove, Timothy L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-02T19:16:36Z
dc.date.available2010-06-02T19:16:36Z
dc.date.issued2009-11-13
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research 114 (2009): B11102en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3574
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2009. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 114 (2009): B11102, doi:10.1029/2008JB006100.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe examine mantle melting, fractional crystallization, and melt extraction beneath fast slipping, segmented oceanic transform fault systems. Three-dimensional mantle flow and thermal structures are calculated using a temperature-dependent rheology that incorporates a viscoplastic approximation for brittle deformation in the lithosphere. Thermal solutions are combined with the near-fractional, polybaric melting model of Kinzler and Grove (1992a, 1992b, 1993) to determine extents of melting, the shape of the melting regime, and major element melt composition. We investigate the mantle source region of intratransform spreading centers (ITSCs) using the melt migration approach of Sparks and Parmentier (1991) for two end-member pooling models: (1) a wide pooling region that incorporates all of the melt focused to the ITSC and (2) a narrow pooling region that assumes melt will not migrate across a transform fault or fracture zone. Assuming wide melt pooling, our model predictions can explain both the systematic crustal thickness excesses observed at intermediate and fast slipping transform faults as well as the deeper and lower extents of melting observed in the vicinity of several transform systems. Applying these techniques to the Siqueiros transform on the East Pacific Rise we find that both the viscoplastic rheology and wide melt pooling are required to explain the observed variations in gravity inferred crustal thickness. Finally, we show that mantle potential temperature Tp = 1350°C and fractional crystallization at depths of 9–15.5 km fit the majority of the major element geochemical data from the Siqueiros transform fault system.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by WHOI Academic Programs Office (PMG), NSF grants OCE-0649103 and OCE-0623188 (MDB), and the Charles D. Hollister Endowed Fund for Support of Innovative Research at WHOI (J.L.).en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2008JB006100
dc.subjectMid-ocean ridgeen_US
dc.subjectOceanic transform faulten_US
dc.subjectSiqueiros transformen_US
dc.titleMelt generation, crystallization, and extraction beneath segmented oceanic transform faultsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2008JB006100


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