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dc.contributor.authorStaudigel, Hubert  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKoppers, Anthony A. P.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLavelle, J. William  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorPitcher, Tony J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorShank, Timothy M.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-06-01T19:13:26Z
dc.date.available2010-06-01T19:13:26Z
dc.date.issued2010-03
dc.identifier.citationOceanography 23, 1 (2010): 212-213en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3552
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Oceanography Society, 2010. This article is posted here by permission of Oceanography Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Oceanography 23, 1 (2010): 212-213.en_US
dc.description.abstractSeamounts are fascinating natural ocean laboratories that inform us about fundamental planetary and ocean processes, ocean ecology and fisheries, and hazards and metal resources. The more than 100,000 large seamounts are a defining structure of global ocean topography and biogeography, and hundreds of thousands of smaller ones are distributed throughout every ocean on Earth.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherOceanography Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2010.72
dc.titleSeamount sciences : quo vadis?en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.5670/oceanog.2010.72


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