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dc.contributor.authorAretxabaleta, Alfredo L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlanton, Brian O.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSeim, Harvey E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWerner, Francisco E.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorNelson, James R.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorChassignet, Eric P.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-21T18:19:43Z
dc.date.available2010-05-21T18:19:43Z
dc.date.issued2007-05-11
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Geophysical Research 112 (2007): C05022en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3487
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Geophysical Research 112 (2007): C05022, doi:10.1029/2006JC003903.en_US
dc.description.abstractA set of model simulations are used to determine the principal forcing mechanisms that resulted in anomalously cold water in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) in the summer of 2003. Updated mass field and elevation boundary conditions from basin-scale Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) simulations are compared to climatological forcing to provide offshore and upstream influences in a one-way nesting sense. Model skill is evaluated by comparing model results with observations of velocity, water level, and surface and bottom temperature. Inclusion of realistic atmospheric forcing, river discharge, and improved model dynamics produced good skill on the inner shelf and midshelf. The intrusion of cold water onto the shelf occurred predominantly along the shelf-break associated with onshore flow in the southern part of the domain north of Cape Canaveral (29° to 31.5°). The atmospheric forcing (anomalously strong and persistent upwelling-favorable winds) was the principal mechanism driving the cold event. Elevated river discharge increased the level of stratification across the inner shelf and midshelf and contributed to additional input of cold water into the shelf. The resulting pool of anomalously cold water constituted more than 50% of the water on the shelf in late July and early August. The excess nutrient flux onto the shelf associated with the upwelling was approximated using published nitrate-temperature proxies, suggesting increased primary production during the summer over most of the SAB shelf.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe preparation of this paper was primarily supported by the Southeast Atlantic Coastal Ocean Observing System (SEACOOS) and the South Atlantic Bight Limited Area Model (SABLAM). SEACOOS is a collaborative, regional program sponsored by the Office of Naval Research under award N00014-02-1-0972 and managed by the University of North Carolina-General Administration. SABLAM was sponsored by the National Ocean Partnership Program (award NAG 13-00041). Data from ship surveys were collected and processed with the support from NSF grant OCE-0099167 (J. R. Nelson), NSF grant OCE-9982133 (J. O. Blanton, SkIO), NASA grant NAG-10557 (J. R. Nelson), and SEACOOS. NOAA NDBC buoy data and NOS coastal water level records were obtained through NOAA-supported data archives and web portals. Moored instrument data from the Carolina Coastal Ocean Observation and Prediction System (Caro-COOPS) were acquired from the system’s website (http://www.carocoops.org). Caro-COOPS is sponsored by NOAA grant NA16RP2543.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2006JC003903
dc.subjectSummer upwellingen_US
dc.subjectModel simulationsen_US
dc.subjectSouth Atlantic Bighten_US
dc.titleCold event in the South Atlantic Bight during summer of 2003 : model simulations and implicationsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2006JC003903


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