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dc.contributor.authorCohen, Anne L.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMcCorkle, Daniel C.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorde Putron, Samantha J.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGaetani, Glenn A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRose, Kathryn A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-21T18:59:30Z
dc.date.available2010-04-21T18:59:30Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-24
dc.identifier.citationGeochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 10 (2009): Q07005en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/3295
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Geophysical Union, 2009. This article is posted here by permission of American Geophysical Union for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Geochemistry Geophysics Geosystems 19 (2009): Q07005, doi:10.1029/2009GC002411.en_US
dc.description.abstractWe reared primary polyps (new recruits) of the common Atlantic golf ball coral Favia fragum for 8 days at 25°C in seawater with aragonite saturation states ranging from ambient (Ω = 3.71) to strongly undersaturated (Ω = 0.22). Aragonite was accreted by all corals, even those reared in strongly undersaturated seawater. However, significant delays, in both the initiation of calcification and subsequent growth of the primary corallite, occurred in corals reared in treatment tanks relative to those grown at ambient conditions. In addition, we observed progressive changes in the size, shape, orientation, and composition of the aragonite crystals used to build the skeleton. With increasing acidification, densely packed bundles of fine aragonite needles gave way to a disordered aggregate of highly faceted rhombs. The Sr/Ca ratios of the crystals, measured by SIMS ion microprobe, increased by 13%, and Mg/Ca ratios decreased by 45%. By comparing these variations in elemental ratios with results from Rayleigh fractionation calculations, we show that the observed changes in crystal morphology and composition are consistent with a >80% decrease in the amount of aragonite precipitated by the corals from each “batch” of calcifying fluid. This suggests that the saturation state of fluid within the isolated calcifying compartment, while maintained by the coral at levels well above that of the external seawater, decreased systematically and significantly as the saturation state of the external seawater decreased. The inability of the corals in acidified treatments to achieve the levels of calcifying fluid supersaturation that drive rapid crystal growth could reflect a limit in the amount of energy available for the proton pumping required for calcification. If so, then the future impact of ocean acidification on tropical coral ecosystems may depend on the ability of individuals or species to overcome this limitation and achieve the levels of calcifying fluid supersaturation required to ensure rapid growth.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by NSF OCE-0648157 and NSF OCE-0823527 and the Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2009GC002411
dc.subjectOcean acidificationen_US
dc.subjectCoralen_US
dc.subjectSr/Caen_US
dc.subjectCalcificationen_US
dc.subjectMg/Caen_US
dc.subjectBiomineralizationen_US
dc.titleMorphological and compositional changes in the skeletons of new coral recruits reared in acidified seawater : insights into the biomineralization response to ocean acidificationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2009GC002411


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