Now showing items 1-2 of 2

  • Baleen whales are not important as prey for killer whales Orcinus orca in high-latitude regions 

    Mehta, Amee V.; Allen, Judith M.; Constantine, Rochelle; Garrigue, Claire; Jann, Beatrice; Jenner, Curt; Marx, Marilyn K.; Matkin, Craig O.; Mattila, David K.; Minton, Gianna; Mizroch, Sally A.; Olavarría, Carlos; Robbins, Jooke; Russell, Kirsty G.; Seton, Rosemary E.; Steiger, Gretchen H.; Víkingsson, Gísli A.; Wade, Paul R.; Witteveen, Briana H.; Clapham, Phillip J. (Inter-Research, 2007-10-25)
    Certain populations of killer whales Orcinus orca feed primarily or exclusively on marine mammals. However, whether or not baleen whales represent an important prey source for killer whales is debatable. A hypothesis by ...
  • Killer whales and marine mammal trends in the North Pacific : a re-examination of evidence for sequential megafauna collapse and the prey-switching hypothesis 

    Wade, Paul R.; Burkanov, Vladimir N.; Dahlheim, Marilyn E.; Friday, Nancy A.; Fritz, Lowell W.; Loughlin, Thomas R.; Mizroch, Sally A.; Muto, Marcia M.; Rice, Dale W.; Barrett-Lennard, Lance G.; Black, Nancy A.; Burdin, Alexander M.; Calambokidis, John; Cerchio, Sal; Ford, John K. B.; Jacobsen, Jeff K.; Matkin, Craig O.; Matkin, Dena R.; Mehta, Amee V.; Small, Robert J.; Straley, Janice M.; McCluskey, Shannon M.; VanBlaricom, Glenn R. (Blackwell, 2007-10-26)
    Springer et al. (2003) contend that sequential declines occurred in North Pacific populations of harbor and fur seals, Steller sea lions, and sea otters. They hypothesize that these were due to increased predation by killer ...