Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorten Brink, Uri S.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-26T14:00:12Z
dc.date.available2009-08-26T14:00:12Z
dc.date.issued2009-03-28
dc.identifier.citationMarine Geology 264 (2009): 1-3en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/2965
dc.descriptionThis paper is not subject to U.S. copyright. The definitive version was published in Marine Geology 264 (2009): 1-3, doi:10.1016/j.margeo.2009.03.011.en
dc.description.abstractAssessment of natural hazards typically relies on analysis of past occurrences of similar disaster events. Assessment of tsunami hazard to the Atlantic coast of the Unites States poses a scientific challenge because of the paucity of both historical events and pre-historic tsunami evidence. The Atlantic coast of the U.S., also known as the U.S. East Coast, is highly vulnerable to tsunami damage because major population centers and industrial facilities are located near the shoreline at low-lying elevations. This is in comparison with the Pacific coast of the United States where tsunamis are more frequent but the coastal regions are more sparsely populated and the emergent coastline has much more relief. The challenge for scientists is therefore to define and quantify the hazard for these rare events.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWork was funded by U.S.-Nuclear Regulatory Commission Job Number N6480.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherElsevier B.V.en
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.margeo.2009.03.011
dc.titleTsunami hazard along the U.S. Atlantic coasten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.margeo.2009.03.011


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record