Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCaudron, Corentin  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorVandemeulebrouck, Jean  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorSohn, Robert A.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-04T19:08:51Z
dc.date.available2022-08-04T19:08:51Z
dc.date.issued2022-04-29
dc.identifier.citationCaudron, C., Vandemeulebrouck, J., & Sohn, R. A. (2022). Turbulence-induced bubble nucleation in hydrothermal fluids beneath Yellowstone Lake. Communications Earth & Environment, 3(1), 103.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/29191
dc.description© The Author(s), 2022. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Caudron, C., Vandemeulebrouck, J., & Sohn, R. A. Turbulence-induced bubble nucleation in hydrothermal fluids beneath Yellowstone Lake. Communications Earth & Environment, 3(1), (2022): 103, https://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00417-6.en_US
dc.description.abstractVolcanic systems generate large amounts of gas, and understanding gas fluxes is a fundamental aspect of volcanology and hazard mitigation. Volcanic gases can be challenging to measure, but acoustic methods hold promise in underwater environments because gas bubbles are powerful sound sources. We deployed an acoustic system to study the nature of gas discharge at a large (~30 MW) thermal field on the floor of Yellowstone Lake, which has experienced numerous hydrothermal explosions since the last glaciation (~13.4 ka). We find that small (<10 Pa) turbulent flow instabilities trigger the nucleation of CO2 bubbles in the saturated fluids. The observation of CO2 bubbles nucleating in hydrothermal fluids due to small pressure perturbations informs our understanding of hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone Lake, and demonstrates that acoustic data in underwater environments can provide insight into the stability of gas-rich systems, as well as gas fluxes.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the National Science Foundation grant EAR-1516361 to R.A.S. All work in Yellowstone National Park was completed under an authorized research permit (YELL-2018-SCI-7018). We also acknowledge the IRGA 2021 Volquan project (funded by Université Grenoble Alpes) and Thomas Jefferson Fund Face Foundation (project TJF20_009 ‘Quantifying underwater volcano degassing using novel seismo-acoustic approaches’).en_US
dc.publisherNature Researchen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s43247-022-00417-6
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleTurbulence-induced bubble nucleation in hydrothermal fluids beneath Yellowstone Lakeen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s43247-022-00417-6


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International