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dc.contributor.authorBarnes, Rebecca T.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorRaymond, Peter A.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorCasciotti, Karen L.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-05T18:11:37Z
dc.date.available2009-08-05T18:11:37Z
dc.date.issued2008-07-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/2904
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Springer, 2008. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Springer for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Biogeochemistry 90 (2008): 15-27, doi:10.1007/s10533-008-9227-2.en
dc.description.abstractNitrogen from atmospheric deposition serves as the dominant source of new nitrogen to forested ecosystems in the northeastern U.S.. By combining isotopic data obtained using the denitrifier method, with chemistry and hydrology measurements we determined the relative importance of sources and control mechanisms on nitrate (NO3-) export from five forested watersheds in the Connecticut River watershed. Microbially produced NO3- was the dominant source (82-100%) of NO3- to the sampled streams as indicated by the δ15N and δ18O of NO3-. Seasonal variations in the δ18O-NO3- in streamwater are controlled by shifting hydrology and temperature affects on biotic processing, resulting in a relative increase in unprocessed NO3- export during winter months. Mass balance estimates find that the unprocessed atmospherically derived NO3- stream flux represents less than 3% of the atmospherically delivered wet NO3- flux to the region. This suggests that despite chronically elevated nitrogen deposition these forests are not nitrogen saturated and are retaining, removing, and reprocessing the vast majority of NO3- delivered to them throughout the year. These results confirm previous work within Northeastern U.S. forests and extend observations to watersheds not dominated by a snow-melt driven hydrology. In contrast to previous work, unprocessed atmospherically derived NO3- export is associated with the period of high recharge and low biotic activity as opposed to spring snowmelt and other large runoff events.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by an EPA STAR Fellowship (FP-91637501-1) and a grant from QLF/The Sound Conservancy to RTB.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-008-9227-2
dc.subjectAtmospheric depositionen
dc.subjectForestsen
dc.subjectNitrogenen
dc.subjectStable isotopesen
dc.titleDual isotope analyses indicate efficient processing of atmospheric nitrate by forested watersheds in the northeastern U.S.en
dc.typePreprinten


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