Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBernhard, Joan M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorLe Roux, Véronique  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Jonathan B.  Concept link
dc.coverage.spatialArctic methane seep in Storfjordrenna (CAGE17-2 902; 76 6.920N 16 00.085E; 370m water depth) and nearby control (non-seep) area (CAGE17-2 900; 76 06.916N 16 00.220E; 371m water depth, collected 22 June 2017); Recent / Modern.
dc.coverage.spatialArctic seep (Lomvi, 15 July 2016, P1606-008, 79.0027N, 6.9248W, 1208 m; non-seep control: P1606-020, 79.0075N, 6.8990W, 1207m) and from the oxygen depleted Santa Barbara Basin (California, USA), collected in February 2017 from 581-m water depth (34 17.288N, 120 02.051W).
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-24T14:30:02Z
dc.date.available2021-11-24T14:30:02Z
dc.date.issued2021-11-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/27782
dc.description.abstractDissociation of methane hydrates due to ocean warming releases methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, to the atmosphere. Dissociation of gas hydrates may have led to rapid and dramatic environmental changes in the past. Thus, understanding the impact of those events requires information about their timing and magnitudes. While the foraminiferal fossil record provides a powerful tool to understand past environmental conditions, seep-endemic foraminifera are unknown, which limits evaluation of seep-specific information. However, geographically widespread benthic foraminifera do inhabit seep sites, as documented widely in the literature, and may provide information useful to the understanding of past methane releases. In an effort to better understand how benthic foraminifera inhabit this chemosynthesis-based ecosystem, and if they faithfully record the methane emissions, we conducted a multipronged analysis of foraminifera associated with a gas hydrate emission site in the Arctic. Our goal was to simultaneously assess, in single representative calcareous benthic foraminiferal individuals, the cell biology, test stable carbon isotope ratio, and carbonate microstructure (e.g., wall thickness, survey for authigenic overgrowths), from samples collected south of Svalbard, or on Vestnesa Ridge, west of Svalbard). Serially, each specimen was scanned with microCT (computerized tomography) to assess test characteristics, then the test dissolved by acidification while capturing gas to measure stable carbon isotope ratio via continuous-flow mass spectrometry, and finally the remaining soft parts embedded and examined for cell ultrastructure with a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM). TEM). Data from isotopic analyses, microCT scans and TEM imaging are presented here.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis project was funded by NSF (WHOI) OCE-1634469 NSF (UFL) OCE-1634248 Norwegian Research Council 223259en_US
dc.publisherWoods Hole Oceanographic Institutionen_US
dc.subjectmethane seepen_US
dc.subjectArcticen_US
dc.subjectStorfjordrennaen_US
dc.subjectVestnesaen_US
dc.subjectLomvien_US
dc.subjectbenthic foraminiferaen_US
dc.subjectmicroCT scanen_US
dc.subjectstable carbon isotopes of calciteen_US
dc.subjectultrastructureen_US
dc.subjectTEMen_US
dc.subjectcytologyen_US
dc.titleImages of cellular ultrastructure of benthic foraminifera from Arctic seepsen_US
dc.typeDataseten_US
dc.identifier.doi10.26025/1912/27782


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record