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dc.contributor.authorMacCord, Kate  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorMaienschein, Jane  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2021-11-23T17:32:49Z
dc.date.available2021-11-23T17:32:49Z
dc.date.issued2021-08-31
dc.identifier.citationMacCord, K., & Maienschein, J. (2021). Explaining regeneration: cells and limbs as complex living systems, learning from history. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 9, 734315.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/27776
dc.description© The Author(s), 2021. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in MacCord, K., & Maienschein, J. Explaining regeneration: cells and limbs as complex living systems, learning from history. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology, 9, (2021): 734315, https://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2021.734315.en_US
dc.description.abstractRegeneration has been investigated since Aristotle, giving rise to many ways of explaining what this process is and how it works. Current research focuses on gene expression and cell signaling of regeneration within individual model organisms. We tend to look to model organisms on the reasoning that because of evolution, information gained from other species must in some respect be generalizable. However, for all that we have uncovered about how regeneration works within individual organisms, we have yet to translate what we have gleaned into achieving the goal of regenerative medicine: to harness and enhance our own regenerative abilities. Turning to history may provide a crucial perspective in advancing us toward this goal. History gives perspective, allowing us to reflect on how our predecessors did their work and what assumptions they made, thus also revealing limitations. History, then, may show us how we can move from our current reductionist thinking focused on particular selected model organisms toward generalizations about this crucial process that operates across complex living systems and move closer to repairing our own damaged bodies.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was a product of the McDonnell Initiative at the Marine Biological Laboratory. The McDonnell Initiative began with support from two generous grants from the James S. McDonnell Foundation, along with substantive input from the Foundation Director, Susan Fitzpatrick (“Integrating the Life Sciences with the History and Philosophy of Science” JSMF Grant No. 220020480 and “Transforming Discovery: Historians, Philosophers, and Life Scientists Exploring Regeneration” JSMF Grant No. 220020480.01).en_US
dc.publisherFrontiers Mediaen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.3389/fcell.2021.734315
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectregenerationen_US
dc.subjectcomplex living systemsen_US
dc.subjectMorganen_US
dc.subjectgeneralizabilityen_US
dc.subjectreductionismen_US
dc.subjectmodel organismsen_US
dc.subjectblastemaen_US
dc.titleExplaining regeneration: cells and limbs as complex living systems, learning from historyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fcell.2021.734315


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International