Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTivey, Margaret K.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-17T17:53:26Z
dc.date.available2009-04-17T17:53:26Z
dc.date.issued2007-03
dc.identifier.citationOceanography 20, 1 (2007): 50-65en
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/2775
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Oceanography Society, 2007. This article is posted here by permission of Oceanography Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Oceanography 20, 1 (2007): 50-65.en
dc.description.abstractIn the nearly 30 years since the discovery of hydrothermal venting along open-ocean spreading centers, much has been learned about the generation of vent fluids and associated deposits. The hot, reducing, metal-rich, magnesium- and sulfatepoor hydrothermal fluids that exit “black smoker” and “white smoker” chimneys are formed through interactions of seawater with oceanic crust. These interactions (1) modify the composition of oceanic crust, (2) affect ocean chemistry, (3) form metal-rich deposits (possible analogs to ore deposits present on land), and (4) provide energy sources for biological communities in the deep sea.en
dc.description.sponsorshipSupport for M.K.T. was provided by National Science Foundation grants OCE-0241796 and OCE- 0327448.en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.publisherOceanography Societyen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.5670/oceanog.2007.80
dc.titleGeneration of seafloor hydrothermal vent fluids and associated mineral depositsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.doi10.5670/oceanog.2007.80


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record