Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTarrant, Ann M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorReitzel, Adam M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBlomquist, Charles H.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorHaller, Ferdinand  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorTokarz, Janina  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorAdamski, Jerzy  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2009-01-22T14:37:36Z
dc.date.available2009-01-22T14:37:36Z
dc.date.issued2008-09-26
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/2703
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Elsevier B.V., 2009. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here by permission of Elsevier B.V. for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Molecular and Cellular Endocrinology 301 (2009): 27-36, doi:10.1016/j.mce.2008.09.037.en
dc.description.abstractCnidarians occupy a key evolutionary position as a sister group to bilaterian animals. While cnidarians contain a diverse complement of steroids, sterols, and other lipid metabolites, relatively little is known of the endogenous steroid metabolism or function in cnidarian tissues. Incubations of cnidarian tissues with steroid substrates have indicated the presence of steroid metabolizing enzymes, particularly enzymes with 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) activity. Through analysis of the genome of the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis, we identified a suite of genes in the short chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR) superfamily including homologs of genes that metabolize steroids in other animals. A more detailed analysis of Hsd17b4 revealed complex evolutionary relationships, apparent intron loss in several taxa, and predominantly adult expression in N. vectensis. Due to its ease of culture and available molecular tools N. vectensis is an excellent model for investigation of cnidarian steroid metabolism and gene function.en
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful for financial support from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) for Assistant Scientist Endowed Support Funds (AMT), the WHOI Academic Programs Office and the Beacon Institute for Rivers and Estuaries (AMR).en
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoen_USen
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.mce.2008.09.037
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.subjectHydroxysteroid dehydrogenaseen
dc.subjectShort chain dehydrogenase/reductaseen
dc.titleSteroid metabolism in cnidarians : insights from Nematostella vectensisen
dc.typePreprinten


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record