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dc.contributor.authorLai, Nicole Y.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBell, Jordan M.  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorBodznick, David  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-28T21:07:11Z
dc.date.issued2021-04-15
dc.identifier.citationLai, N. Y., Bell, J. M., & Bodznick, D. (2021). Multiple behavior-specific cancellation signals contribute to suppressing predictable sensory reafference in a cerebellum-like structure. Journal of Experimental Biology, 224(7), jeb.240143.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/27028
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © Company of Biologists, 2021. This article is posted here by permission of Company of Biologists for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Experimental Biology 224(7), (2021): jeb.240143, https://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.240143.en_US
dc.description.abstractMovement induces sensory stimulation of an animal's own sensory receptors, termed reafference. With a few exceptions, notably vestibular and proprioception, this reafference is unwanted sensory noise and must be selectively filtered in order to detect relevant external sensory signals. In the cerebellum-like electrosensory nucleus of elasmobranch fish, an adaptive filter preserves novel signals by generating cancellation signals that suppress predictable reafference. A parallel fiber network supplies the principal Purkinje-like neurons (called ascending efferent neurons, AENs) with behavior-associated internal reference signals, including motor corollary discharge and sensory feedback, from which predictive cancellation signals are formed. How distinct behavior-specific cancellation signals interact within AENs when multiple behaviors co-occur and produce complex, changing patterns of reafference is unknown. Here, we show that when multiple streams of internal reference signals are available, cancellation signals form that are specific to parallel fiber inputs temporally correlated with, and therefore predictive of, sensory reafference. A single AEN has the capacity to form more than one cancellation signal, and AENs form multiple cancellation signals simultaneously and modify them independently during co-occurring behaviors. Cancellation signals update incrementally during continuous behaviors, as well as episodic bouts of behavior that last minutes to hours. Finally, individual AENs, independently of their neighbors, form unique AEN-specific cancellation signals that depend on the particular sensory reafferent input it receives. Together, these results demonstrate the capacity of the adaptive filter to utilize multiple cancellation signals to suppress dynamic patterns of reafference arising from complex co-occurring and intermittently performed behaviors.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by National Science Foundation (NSF) and Wesleyan University grants to D.B. N.Y.L. was supported by Wesleyan University grants, a Freeman Asian Scholarship, and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute award for undergraduate summer research.en_US
dc.publisherThe Company of Biologistsen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1242/jeb.240143
dc.subjectSensory feedbacken_US
dc.subjectPurkinje neuronen_US
dc.subjectAscending efferent neuronen_US
dc.subjectForward modelen_US
dc.subjectElasmobranchen_US
dc.subjectSensory noiseen_US
dc.titleMultiple behavior-specific cancellation signals contribute to suppressing predictable sensory reafference in a cerebellum-like structureen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2022-04-15en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1242/jeb.240143
dc.embargo.liftdate2022-04-15


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