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dc.contributor.authorLoranger, Scott  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorWeber, Thomas C.  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T19:33:37Z
dc.date.available2021-04-12T19:33:37Z
dc.date.issued2020-10-15
dc.identifier.citationLoranger, S., & Weber, T. C. (2020). Shipboard acoustic observations of flow rate from a seafloor-sourced oil spill. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125(10), e2020JC016274.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/26940
dc.description© The Author(s), 2020. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License. The definitive version was published in Loranger, S., & Weber, T. C. . Shipboard acoustic observations of flow rate from a seafloor-sourced oil spill. Journal of Geophysical Research: Oceans, 125(10), (2020): e2020JC016274, https://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016274.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn 2004 a debris flow generated by Hurricane Ivan toppled an oil production platform in Mississippi Canyon lease block 20 (MC20). Between 2004 and the installation of a containment system in 2019 MC20 became an in situ laboratory for a wide range of hydrocarbon in the sea‐related research, including different methods of assessing the volumetric flow rate of hydrocarbons spanning different temporal scales. In 2017 a shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and high‐frequency (90 to 154 kHz) broadband echosounder were deployed to assess the flow rate of liquid and gas phase hydrocarbons. Measurements of horizontal currents were combined with acoustic mapping to determine the rise velocity of the seep as it moved downstream. Models of the rise velocity for fluid particles were used to predict the size of oil droplets and gas bubbles in the seep. The amplitude and shape of the broadband acoustic backscatter were then used to differentiate between, and determine the flow rate of, hydrocarbons. Oil flow rate in the seep was estimated to be 56 to 86 barrels/day (mean urn:x-wiley:jgrc:media:jgrc24228:jgrc24228-math-0001 barrels/day) while the flow rate of gaseous hydrocarbons was estimated to be 98 to 359 m3/day (mean urn:x-wiley:jgrc:media:jgrc24228:jgrc24228-math-0002 m3/day).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work was supported by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Grant NA15NOS4000200).en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Unionen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1029/2020JC016274
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectoil spillen_US
dc.subjectacousticsen_US
dc.subjectflow rateen_US
dc.subjectMC20en_US
dc.titleShipboard acoustic observations of flow rate from a seafloor-sourced oil spillen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2020JC016274


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International