Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSimon, Amélie  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorFrankignoul, Claude  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorGastineau, Guillaume  Concept link
dc.contributor.authorKwon, Young-Oh  Concept link
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-02T21:12:21Z
dc.date.available2020-10-06T07:51:37Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-06
dc.identifier.citationSimon, A., Frankignoul, C., Gastineau, G., & Kwon, Y. (2020). An observational estimate of the direct response of the cold-season atmospheric circulation to the Arctic Sea ice loss. Journal of Climate, 33(9), 3863-3882.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/1912/26274
dc.descriptionAuthor Posting. © American Meteorological Society, 2020. This article is posted here by permission of American Meteorological Society for personal use, not for redistribution. The definitive version was published in Journal of Climate 33(9), (2020): 3863-3882, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0687.1.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe direct response of the cold-season atmospheric circulation to the Arctic sea ice loss is estimated from observed sea ice concentration (SIC) and an atmospheric reanalysis, assuming that the atmospheric response to the long-term sea ice loss is the same as that to interannual pan-Arctic SIC fluctuations with identical spatial patterns. No large-scale relationship with previous interannual SIC fluctuations is found in October and November, but a negative North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO)/Arctic Oscillation follows the pan-Arctic SIC fluctuations from December to March. The signal is field significant in the stratosphere in December, and in the troposphere and tropopause thereafter. However, multiple regressions indicate that the stratospheric December signal is largely due to concomitant Siberian snow-cover anomalies. On the other hand, the tropospheric January–March NAO signals can be unambiguously attributed to SIC variability, with an Iceland high approaching 45 m at 500 hPa, a 2°C surface air warming in northeastern Canada, and a modulation of blocking activity in the North Atlantic sector. In March, a 1°C northern Europe cooling is also attributed to SIC. An SIC impact on the warm Arctic–cold Eurasia pattern is only found in February in relation to January SIC. Extrapolating the most robust results suggests that, in the absence of other forcings, the SIC loss between 1979 and 2016 would have induced a 2°–3°C decade−1 winter warming in northeastern North America and a 40–60 m decade−1 increase in the height of the Iceland high, if linearity and perpetual winter conditions could be assumed.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the Blue-Action project (European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program, Grant 727852) and by the National Science Foundation (OPP 1736738).en_US
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Societyen_US
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0687.1
dc.subjectAtmosphere-ocean interactionen_US
dc.subjectClimate changeen_US
dc.subjectClimate variabilityen_US
dc.subjectIce loss/growthen_US
dc.titleAn observational estimate of the direct response of the cold-season atmospheric circulation to the Arctic Sea ice lossen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.embargo2020-10-06en_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0687.1


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record